August Food News

happy-cones-ice-cream

Courtesy Happy Cones Co.

WHAT’S PINK, GREEN AND HUGE?
Before cantaloupes made the name Rocky Ford famous, the southern Colorado town was perhaps best known for its watermelons. G.W. Swink, the man responsible for transforming Rocky Ford into the de facto melon capital of the West, held the first Watermelon Day—one of the state’s oldest (and stickiest) traditions—in 1878. On Aug. 18, the 140th WATERMELON DAY will take place at the Arkansas Valley Fair. The lively celebration will feature watermelon carving, a seed-spitting contest, a 5K and 10K fun run, a rodeo, a beer garden, musical performances and the famous “watermelon pile”—50,000 pounds of the sweet summer fruit, gathered into a massive pile and free for the taking. Admission, $30.

TWICE AS NICE
Two venerable resorts, the BROADMOOR HOTEL in Colorado Springs and SEA ISLAND on the Georgia coast, have paired up to produce a boxed set of cookbooks, by Sarah Anschutz Hunt, that celebrate the unique regional cuisine and culture of the two vacation spots.

CONE-HEADS
Hap Cameron, creator of the New Zealand-style ice cream truck HAPPY CONES CO., set an ambitious goal for himself at the age of 21: to live and work on every continent before the age of 30. Over the next nine years, he worked 32 jobs all around the world—from oil rigs in Canada to a Mexican orphanage to an Antarctic cruise ship. Now he has settled in Denver and devoted himself to serving real fruit ice cream (a New Zealand innovation) to the Mile High City. The unique frozen treat combines small-batch ice cream with real pulverized fruit to create a colorful soft serve that’s like nothing you’ve tasted before.

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